10k Buggy Hauler Trailer Build - Torsion Axles?

dgoodwin10

Active Member
Joined
Jul 22, 2014
Location
Birmingham, AL
I am in the planning stages of a 22' full width 10k trailer build and the design will be loosely based off of a PJ B5 buggy hauler . I told myself after building a 12' utility trailer that it makes way more sense to buy one...but here we are. Aside from the lead times I keep hearing, the thing that is tipping the scales toward another build is the opportunity to get a pair of installed a few years ago and never used 5200# torsion axles for just about free. In all my research PJ is the only company that uses them on an equipment trailer and it's a tilt unit. Why is that? Am I missing something obvious as to why they can't or aren't used more often? I have a decent understanding of trailer suspension and know that these axles will be independent of each other, so the load won't be shared between the axles like a leaf spring setup with equalizer bar. What say ye NC4x4.
 

jeepinmatt

At least half the people are dumber than the rest
Joined
Mar 24, 2005
Location
Stanley, NC
I say go for it! Most of the 14k trailers I looked at had the option of torsion axles, but the upcharge was like a grand, and it's "different" so most people don't want to pay extra for different that doesn't increase capability.
 

shawn

running dog lackey of the oppressor class
Administrator
Joined
Mar 13, 2005
Location
Raleigh, NC
Our 34’ stock trailer has tandem 10k torsion axles and it rides like butter. Not sure if this is what you’re asking but it’s my .02

This. The difference between leaf springs and independent suspension is night and day.
 

shawn

running dog lackey of the oppressor class
Administrator
Joined
Mar 13, 2005
Location
Raleigh, NC
these axles will be independent of each other, so the load won't be shared between the axles like a leaf spring setup

It's not just the axles that are independent - it's independent from left to right, too. The big issue is that the trailer needs to be dead level. The axles aren't able to balance against one another, so if you tow it nose up or nose down, you're loading one axle more heavily than the other.
 

paradisePWoffrd

Recovering Project Junkie
Joined
Nov 5, 2005
Location
Newton, NC
It's not just the axles that are independent - it's independent from left to right, too. The big issue is that the trailer needs to be dead level. The axles aren't able to balance against one another, so if you tow it nose up or nose down, you're loading one axle more heavily than the other.
I feel like loading the trailer would be more critical as well. Since the springs are all independent, you could more easily overload one axle/wheel.

Id say the biggest reason you dont see them more, is cost. Most people are looking for the cheapest trailer they can find.
 
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