Exotic Engineering "WTH"

WARRIORWELDING

Owner opperator Of WarriorWelding LLC.
Joined
Jan 6, 2008
Location
Chillin, Hwy 64 Mocksville NC
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Discuss?
 

zuke

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 4, 2012
Location
Stafford, VA
Looks like Silicone/Bronze Welding, can be done with a TIG or MIG setup.

It's actually more of a brazing type of connection, There isn't a lot of melting of the base metal, And I thought it isn't as strong as regular steel welding, but I could be wrong.
 

Jeff B

Thanos was right
Joined
Dec 23, 2006
Location
Lincolnton N.C.
Looks like tack, tack, tack, tack, tack, tack.
 

RatLabGuy

You look like a monkey and smell like one too
Joined
May 18, 2005
Location
Churchville, MD
Looks like a brazing technique to me. Keep in mind we don't that this is actually something structural. I mean, it looks like it would be, but maybe they did this judt for something neat to look at to have on their site.
 

Fabrik8

Overcomplicator
Joined
May 27, 2015
Location
Huntersville
This is nothing new. Worked great for structural space frame race cars back in the '50s and '60s. It's a specialty alloy rod with fairly high tensile strength from what I remember (not just generic silicon bronze brazing rod), with a gasflux process (another specialized process). I think TIG overtook it, when TIG became commercially available, but it still has some advantages that I can't recall. The only time I've heard people talk about it was for race cars, and heard that the tensile strength is not too much different than an as-welded TIG bead that's not post treated at all, depending on the steel alloy. Obviously if you're doing post weld heat treatment of TIG welded structures, that would be superior. I don't know the specifics of any of that stuff.

I don't really know if there's any difference in joint design, but I would imagine there may be.

That's all I've got. So not exotic at all, just a process that really isn't used much anymore.
 
Last edited:

Chris_Keziah

Joe Dirt @ Rev Limit Fab
Joined
Dec 1, 2010
Location
Winston-Salem
This is nothing new. Worked great for structural space frame race cars back in the '50s and '60s. It's a specialty alloy rod with fairly high tensile strength from what I remember (not just generic silicon bronze brazing rod), with a gasflux process (another specialized process). I think TIG overtook it, when TIG became commercially available, but it still has some advantages that I can't recall. The only time I've heard people talk about it was for race cars, and that the tensile strength is not too much different than an as-welded TIG bead that's not post treated at all, depending on the steel alloy. Obviously if you're doing post weld heat treatment of TIG welded structures, that would be superior.

I don't really know if there's any difference in joint design, but I would imagine there may be.

That's all I've got. So not exotic at all, just a process that really isn't used much anymore.

I was doing some googling earlier on it and it seems as if they have some special blend of herbs and spices to get 70ksi, range i found said 25-70ksi.
 

shawn

running dog lackey of the oppressor class
Administrator
Joined
Mar 13, 2005
Location
Raleigh, NC
The only reason it was sifbronze brazed is because it was built in the UK and they still use those processes, not because it's any better, especially being regular carbon steel. You can clearly see a large HAZ on the tubing and lots of cold joints with the spacing. So maybe not the wrong process but maybe the wrong welder.

This. It's been common in the UK for a long time. Lots of race car chassis and motorcycle frames built this way.
 

NickMaul

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2009
Location
Norfolk, VA
Very interesting. The HAZ on that weld looks pretty serious, but I suppose that is normal results with brazing. Must be an easy way to justify over pricing the customer :D


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hurt4x4

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2012
Location
Greensboro
There's a lot of high dollar silicon bronze brazed bike frames out there, and with proper joint design it's just as strong as any other type of welding. The above picture I would hope is nothing but a showpiece for the website.
 

WARRIORWELDING

Owner opperator Of WarriorWelding LLC.
Joined
Jan 6, 2008
Location
Chillin, Hwy 64 Mocksville NC
I knew exactly what it was when I saw it....wanted some more points of view.
Mine is the process compared to welding is weaker. Alloys included. It relies on capilary action for bonding.
Was aware of its uses in very light weight "highly engineered" and or applications within the stress and strain modulus..i.e. Light bicycle frames and well designed carts.

This however is horribly executed, applied to heavier wall dom, and is in an intended off road abusive climate. The engineering doesn't match the aplication. The execution sucks and its all hidden in the exorbant price tag.
 

NickMaul

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 4, 2009
Location
Norfolk, VA
I know titanium alloy is expensive but why not make the frame out of titanium. It’s certainly weldable.


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