Pressure oil prelube on the cheap..

Discussion in 'General Tech' started by a_kelley, Mar 15, 2019.

  1. a_kelley

    a_kelley mister mechanical fixer

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Location:
    Rutherfordton
    Plus high dollar bonus functions at the end!!


    So you have a crank driven oil pump motor and you want to prime it before you start it, huh?

    Well what you need is a pressure pre-oiler.

    I'll show you how you can make one for $45 plus tax, today, right now. A pressure lube setup goes for goes for over $100 from what I've seen briefly looking. I didn't really care if I could find one for $35 online, I wanted it today. Well, now you can make one today.

    Enter the HFT 64oz spray gun kit.
    IMG_20190315_021633887s.jpg

    Ok so now that you bought that, throw the black hose the spray gun in the trash, you wouldn't want to paint with this after it's had oil run through it anyway. Or keep it for a spare for your other sprayer.

    Remove the air feed with the gauge. (I've done thrown it out, but there's a nut on the inside of the can and two screws that hold it on.) Scrape the gasket off. Now find a bolt to fit the larger center hole and put a washer on it big enough to cover the two smaller holes. Add ultra grey and install the bolt & washer.

    Next, screw the red hose onto the ball valve. Cut the opposite end off or if you're patient, find an adapter fitting to go to your oil gallery plug. I'm not patient enough for all that, especially with Chinese fittings. I simply cut the hose and used a hose barb to pipe thread adapter to attach it to the oil gallery.

    You need to drill and tap a hole for a quick connect air fitting. You MUST connect the setup to a regulated air supply. There is a built in pressure relief valve (and bleed valve also) that is retained in the remaining parts on the lid. I put a ball valve in after the QC so that I did not need to disconnect the air line to refill the container, all I need to do is turn off both ball valves, bleed the pressure off with the bleeder & unscrew the jug to fill.

    Here's what mine looked like when I was finished.

    IMG_20190315_015218378s.jpg

    To use it, fill the container with oil. Turn off both valves, connect the air line to a regulated supply, connect the red hose to the oil gallery, screw the bottle onto the lid, make sure the bleeder is closed, then turn on the air, then turn on the oil. It will then force oil through the motor at whatever pressure you're feeding it. The destructions said max 50 psi, which is just fine for pressure lubing an engine.

    In use:
    IMG_20190315_015316799s.jpg

    I don't think they will let me return it though.. but why would I? It's too useful. There are more uses for this thing than just feeding lube to a motor.. you could clean it (or better yet, cut the hose in half, instead of at one end like I did) and after you got the bottle and pipe clean, you can fill it with brake fluid and use it to reverse bleed brakes!!!! I'm so glad I just thought of that. You can also use it combined with a vacuum pump to evacuate fluids. Just it only holds 2 quarts, and if I were to use it to evacuate any fluid, I would add a catch can to save my vacuum pump.
     
  2. Mac5005

    Mac5005 Welding Instructor

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2005
    Location:
    Rocky Mount
    That’s awesome.
     
  3. Croatan_Kid

    Croatan_Kid More parts than a 9 dollar chicken bucket!

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2007
    Location:
    New Bern
    A buddy of mine has a modified propane tank and I was planning to use this air pig I have laying around my shop. Same principle. I dig it!

    Keeping things lubed is very important :D
     
    Scooter402 likes this.
  4. yager

    yager Better Faster Stronger

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    Wake Forest, NC
    Excellent !
     
  5. Fabrik8

    Fabrik8 Overcomplicator

    Joined:
    May 27, 2015
    Location:
    Huntersville
    Because of the fluid capacity, I would use this as the catch can and use something else for the fluid. Like a pressure cooker pot.

    I use similar setups for doing vacuum bagged composites (resin infusion in this case), and use a similar catch can to protect the pump from liquid resin. Never thought to use a cheap pressure pot like that though, that's a good idea. Need to see how much vacuum it will hold.
     
  6. a_kelley

    a_kelley mister mechanical fixer

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Location:
    Rutherfordton
    If the seals are good, near full vacuum.
     
  7. rodney eppes

    rodney eppes Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2010
    Location:
    Mt.Holly NC 28120
    That's a neat idea! First I thought you were talking about a running rig. Like my carbed CJ. If it's sat more than a couple days, I can just spin the starter, because that carb is Dry! If I want a quick start, I prime the carb with an ad-on electric fuel pump. :p
     
    a_kelley likes this.
  8. DAWGTOY

    DAWGTOY Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Location:
    tanzania
    made mine out of an old 10 lb fire extinguisher.
     
  9. a_kelley

    a_kelley mister mechanical fixer

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2010
    Location:
    Rutherfordton
    If I had a suitable vessel that was clean, I would have went that route. I considered an air tank, a propane tank, or anything else that would hold pressure but I couldn't come up with anything that was clean. Hindsight says the air tank would have been better, but I didn't want a 7 gallon vessel, plus it would not have any convenient way to fill it. I've used an air tank to vacuum fill cooling systems before, with a vacuum pump and pressure test adapter, but this was a little more critical for it to be clean. Plus it's only 2qt, so it lends itself to other applications.
     
    yager and Mac5005 like this.
  10. DAWGTOY

    DAWGTOY Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2006
    Location:
    tanzania
    yeah it was a bitch to clean out all that yellow dust---lots of washing to get it clean.
    it is kinda hard to fill with just a 1/2 inlet but gets the job done.
     

Share This Page