Diesel Secret?!?

Discussion in 'Tow Rigs and Trailers' started by SHINTON, Sep 22, 2005.

  1. SHINTON

    SHINTON Well-Known Member

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    Triad area of NC
    http://www.dieselsecrets.com/index.htm

    Saw this come across the wire, does NOT require a conversion kit on the vehicle!!!

    (For legal purposes, I believe we have found out you WILL need to register with the state of NC and pay roadtax directly if you go this route)

    Sam
     
  2. tommy_boync

    tommy_boync New Member

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    sanford
    has enyone tired this sounds pretty cool to me?????
     
  3. Rob

    Rob Administrator Administrator

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    Sanford, NC
    Sounds like a gimick to me. "For just $19.95 you too can have cheap fuel, and the fuel companies can't do a thing about it. Just call this toll free number and the first million to call will get a free blow up doll"

    Disclaimer; I have not researched it or paid much attention to it, just sounds like one of those "too good to be true" deals.
     
  4. StudNuts

    StudNuts Well-Known Member

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    Wendell
    ive read most of the website. It dont sound horribly bad, looks like they just mfg'ed a concentrated chemical meth mixture. I guess it saves the user from having to titrate it themselves. You still need to buy holding and mixing tanks.
     
  5. BIGWOODY

    BIGWOODY Well-Known Member

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    Thomasville

    Ummmm.... I need that number...... ummm for a friend of mine...that's it. !
     
  6. BRUISER

    BRUISER silent.. but deadly Moderator

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    So basically you are making your own BIO Diesel at home.. you still need to set up a cooker and brew system to make it work and you still need to get oil from restaurants to cook...

    Why spend $19 to this guy when you can search for Bio Deisel and get all the directions for Free....
     
  7. Rich

    Rich Asshole at large

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    Location:
    Central PA
    From what I can tell, it's using "Micro Emulsion" to suspend the stuff that transesterfication seperates out as part of the prep process.

    Funny thing is, most of what i've read about this process, 20% of the fuel is made up of water...

    Did a whois search on the company.. They are based out of Sunset, Louisiana. At least it's not in Cali or Florida.

    Interesting... I might have to make sure I can get oil easily, then look into this further.

    EDIT: ken - I don't believe there is any 'cooking' involved. The idea is to suspend that bad stuff and let it pass through, instead of cooking it out.
     
  8. greg slade

    greg slade The Moderated

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    I think Rich is making up words again to try and sound smarter than he really is. :flipoff2:
     
  9. SHINTON

    SHINTON Well-Known Member

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    Triad area of NC
    "Even if" I am having to do some light mfg...the fact that you are not having to do $2000 of work to your rig to use it makes it more interesting than the normal greasal stuff I hear about?!?

    They do LOOK gimmicky on their website, which if they are serious hurts them in my book...

    THERE IS A CATCH, no doubt at all in my mind about this...or BP, Sunoco, etc would be lining up to do this....if nothing else a source of the used cooking oil....

    (NEW cooking oil is prob too expensive per gallon....which is the main catch, only way it works is someone else absorbing the true cost per gallon)

    Sam...cheapskate...Hinton
     
  10. BIGWOODY

    BIGWOODY Well-Known Member

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    I thought Transesterfication was the title of a Sanford and Son episode, where they had to move Lamonts' aunt to a nursing home?
     
  11. greg slade

    greg slade The Moderated

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    timberlake
    bwaaaaaa,haaaaaaaa

    I'll take obscure 80's TV references for $1.00 alex.

    yeah but 2 grand worth of work gets you the ability to do this on the fly with almost no prepwork.
     
  12. BIGWOODY

    BIGWOODY Well-Known Member

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    Thomasville
    Just for shits and giggles, I bought my greasel system about 6 months ago and it paid for itself last month. Makes it nice when someone says "hey lets go to Winrock,Tellico, etc..." and I think to myself..it's not going to cost anymore than if I just stayed home. Not to mention around town driving or trips to the beach, mountains, etc.. and it'll do it all on the fly.
     
  13. Rich

    Rich Asshole at large

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    Central PA
    It's a real word, but I did have to check the spelling on it.

    Drawback I can imagine, but not sure if it's a real issue: With the "brewed" bio using the lye, heat, washing, etc... the byproduct is glycerin, which is removed and apparently makes a good degreaser... BUT, with this stuff on the "Diesel secret", from what I gather, all the stuff that makes raw veg. oil at room temp not suitable to burn and is otherwise seperated out it instead put into suspension, and passes through the fuel system.

    Is it an issue? Maybe, maybe not. Rigs with the conversion to raw veggi oil pass this same stuff through their fuel system. Different injection systems respond differently to that. Some are OK with it, some aren't.

    Just a WAG, but if the injection system on your diesel isn't recommended to work with 100% WVO, I don't "think" using this stuff would be a hot idea. I very well could be wrong.

    I can say for sure that the p7100 pumps on the 12 valve CTD's doesn't give a damn what you run through it, since it's lubed and cooled by engine oil, not the fuel itself. Your engine may vary...

    here's a quote from the GreenTrust website:
    http://www.green-trust.org/biodiesel.htm

    "Vegetable Oils are the best candidates for diesel fuels in diesel engines. Several vegetable oils have been tried as substitutes, but continued use of triglyceride fuels in the diesel engine has presented problems in fuel injector coking and crankcase lubricant polymerization. Both of these problems have been attributed to high viscosity of vegetable oil, which is approximately 10-20 times higher than petrodiesel. Higher viscosity causes the poor atomization of fuel in the injector system and poor spray pattern. Viscosity can be reduced by following four ways (a) By blending, (b)By transesterification, (c) By microemulsification, and (d) By pyrolysis. By using any of these procedures, appreciable amount of viscosity reduction and improved spray pattern can be achieved."
     
  14. greg slade

    greg slade The Moderated

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    It's my understanding that in the greasel kits, the WVO is so superheated that it lowers the viscosity greatly and allows the WVO to flow freely, therefore reducing the potential for injector and related problems. whew.
     
  15. fryedaddy

    fryedaddy Well-Known Member

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    Mar 22, 2005
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    Winston-Salem
    Diesel

    I've always thought it was bad when you smell diesel riding down the road. It's really going to be bad smelling other people's lunch like hamburgers and fish.
     
  16. Rich

    Rich Asshole at large

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    I dunno, I kinda like the idea of everyone behind me getting a Big Mac attack! :D

    Greg - You're right about heating the oil.. The microemulsification process doesn't need this, as the process itself thins out the oil. That's what makes this interesting to me.. Very little modification. (Though there is something very cool about just backing up to the waste oil tank, sucking it in through a filter, and going home and having the tank heated...)
     
  17. BIGWOODY

    BIGWOODY Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Thomasville
    The veggi oil in my system is heated to about 180 degrees on a cool day and as much as 220 on a hot day. The tank itself has a lower chamber that cooloant from the engine passes through, thus heating the entire tank. The veggi then leaves the tank and passes through a water seperator/10micron filter that is also heated.The oil then travels from the seperator/filter mounted on the aux. tank through a fuel line that is wrapped with both coolant lines (from the motor to aux tank) in one large hose, heating it all the way to the switch over valve mounted just before the stock fuel filter. It's very thin by the time it reaches the injection pump and has been filter 3 times. Works well and again, I can pull up to a resturant, pump oil, drive off.
    As far as the smell, its way better than diesel smoke, sorta like a mobile Mcdonalds.
     
  18. upnover

    upnover Grumpy, decrepit Old Man Moderator

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    Mar 20, 2005
    Location:
    Morganton NC
    Makes me wish I owned an oil burner!
    A couple questions. You talk about it being heated, what about when the temp drops low in the winter and all that has been processed solidifies?

    2. I ran eating joints fo 17 years, We sold our waste oil grease and what ever else may have gotten thrown in there to a company called Carolina recyclers. It was my understanding that they used it as an ingredient in making make up for women ( at least in those days) They paid very little for it, but they did pay. I am curious as to how many places (sources) you have for getting this, and do you call ahead when you travel to see if there is some available? Or do you go from one place to another asking, or,... do you just back up and pump.
     
  19. Motorman

    Motorman Member

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    It is all about viscosity ........

    Be it Bio-diesel or straight WVO, and probably the "stuff" advertised at the front of this post, it is all about viscosity. Bio-diesel goes through a chemical process to create a mixture that can be stored in a tank, pulled into the majority of diesel engines, and flow and burn effectively at almost all temperatures. WVO gets it's viscosity improved by heating it (BIGWOODY described his system above) so it flows properly, and since it is the same basic ingredient you find in Bio-diesel, once in the combustion chamber it too will burn efficiently. It just needs to be filtered and heated to flow efficiently enough to get there. I imagine the "stuff" discussed in the front end of this post is creating a vegetable oil/bio based concoction that flows well enough and burns well enough to run a diesel on as well. They are all just different bio-based type fuels that the diesel was originally designed to run on.
    Rich made a good point as well in that some diesels are more tolerant of these thicker viscosity fuels than others and are therefore less prone to "bio-fuel" problems. The 24 valve Cummins in the 98.5+ Dodges is one power plant that gets written up as one to be wary of due to it's marginal fuel pump. That is just one that I have read about, I am sure there are others.
     
  20. Ron

    Ron Dum Spiro Spero Moderator

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    Location:
    Sharon, SC
    I have been looking into a new oil burner for a few months for just this reason. I have done a fair amount of research (even though I have not learned any cool words like Rich :flipoff2: ) Basically my thoughts on the two style bio setups are this
    1) Have an in vehicle set up like BIGWOODY describes
    Pros:
    back right up to tank and pump
    painless
    and portable

    Cons:
    Complicated installation
    Loss of Bed space ( for tanks and heating)

    2) Have the home brew set up
    (the company I was researching was featured on TRUCKS! a few weks back their info is at the office I willget name and repost tomorrow unless someone here knows it?)

    Pros:
    No vehicle mods required,
    Easy to swap back and forth on long trips
    No lost space
    No winter sludge worries (the heat set ups use engine heat to improve viscosity, they need a back up in winter to start the flow process that will heat the engine to heat the oil)
    There is at least the potential to "brew" and sale
    Cons:
    Space that was saved in vehicle is now wasted in garage 10 fold
    Messy and more labor intensive
    WORST OF ALL IMHO you can only fill up at home, this is worthless for long travel

    All that said when I get an oiler I will prolly buy a home brew set up, just so the dealership has no questions since they will not know/ have proof what type of fuel is being utilized, therfor no warranty issues

    Thoughts?
     
  21. BIGWOODY

    BIGWOODY Well-Known Member

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    Mar 21, 2005
    Location:
    Thomasville

    To answer your questions: I collect oil from my buddies resturants usually 100gallons pick ups. He has a couple of tanks, I collect from the one thats been full the longest (water sinks, oil floats) and that starts the filtering process. The tank in the bed of my truck is 100gallons divided in half (50 a side). The tray that coolant flows through spans the entire length of the underside of the tank (as to heat both sides). When I pull up to collect I do so in the "dirty" side of the tank,let it heat, then pump it through a "filter sock" into the clean side of the tank. The sock catches small pieces,thick lard etc..(sounds nice huh?). When I travel I have 100 gallons when I leave the house, I also have both stock diesel tanks on my truck fuel of diesel(just in case). I can tow my jeep at 65mph for 1500 miles on the veggi system, I rarely go that far, but when I have , I've never been without oil. Most resturant owners love the idea and like to be able to tell the story (go to mom-n-pop type places). There is a downside to any system though, it's not a plesant experience gathering oil and it can get messy, so those full of pride may want to pull their panties up and pay out the ass for fuel.. :flipoff2:
     
  22. madmonk

    madmonk Well-Known Member

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    greensboro nc
    thanks for lettin this post fly this time, alot of good info. I guess gas wasn't expensive enough last time , not trying to be the spoiler but make up your minds.
     
  23. tommy_boync

    tommy_boync New Member

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    sanford
    HAS ENYONE ACTUALLY TIRED THIS?????? I don't have a oilburner yet but will be buying one as soon as i can. Just needs for work but hell if I can save 3.50 a gallan that is the ticket.
     
  24. SHINTON

    SHINTON Well-Known Member

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    Mar 17, 2005
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    Triad area of NC
    Heh..that is why I threw in my first post "(For legal purposes, I believe we have found out you WILL need to register with the state of NC and pay roadtax directly if you go this route)"

    Just in case Tommy TaxRevenueAgent is lurking...I am SURE all of us are 100% compliant in all rules of the land. :lol:

    Just one of those...lets talk about it but lets also make sure we do "know" what we "should" be doing to be legal as well...sigh.

    Rich/Greg/others who know what the heck you are reading...one of the "worries" on dieselstop is the lubrication factor on the rings reducing life of the engine? (I am a mechanical idiot but I THINK what they are talking about is diesel is "oily" and somewhat lubricates the cylinder, as does the oil itself in your engine?")

    So...any thoughts on THIS process, and the superduper transmorphiwhatever process etc?

    Sam...not sure how smelling fries on my daily drive will help my diet...Hinton
     
  25. sam(slim)

    sam(slim) Well-Known Member

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    Mar 21, 2005
    Location:
    Winston-Salem, NC
    As far as lubrication I think you would be ok. Years ago trucking companys would mix trans fluid and used motor oil with diesel fuel and burn it in the trucks to get rid of it. But now they can't because of federal laws.

    As far as the legal side of thing, running waste oil should fall under the same law as running off road diesel on road if they wanted to fine you. (It's the not paying road tax that will get you)

    Sam(slim)
     

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